Onboarding

  1. Obtain a UW email (complete by March 1)
    • You will receive an email and an application for a UW email at your school email.
    • Complete the application, have the form notarized with your signature and photo ID
    • Fax the form to UW IT at 206-221-5001using instructions
    • Email Lisa Mancl your UW NetID user name, so that next steps can be initiated.
    • Set up your UW NetID for email using UW Exchange Online
  2. Complete UW LEND Registration and email all documents to Lisa Mancl (complete by April 1)
  3. Wait to hear back from your preceptor, Lisa Mancl, that all documents are complete and next steps are ready.
  4. Complete electronic medical records registration and training (Complete by May 15)
    •  Set up UW Medicine account: go to myuw and log in with your UW net ID. Locate the “UW Medicine Computing Services” section and click “Change your UW Medicine password”. The link may read “Retrieve and change your UW Medicine password” instead of “Change your UW Medicine password”.
    • Complete training through the Learning Management System: go to the UW Medicine Learning Management System and log in with your UW NetID and password.  Use the guidelines. Find the “To Do” section in the middle navigation panel and the “EHR EpicCare – Audiology Students” curriculum. Click on the small arrow to expand the list of modules. Note that in some browsers it is difficult to see the small triangle that must be expanded to see all of the green start buttons. Training modules include:
      • EpicCare Training
      • Protecting Patient Information (HIPAA) Training
      • Refresher Training – this module covers infection control
      • Print the completion certificates for your training modules
    • Send documentation of completion of UWMC  training to lmancl@uw.edu by May 15
  5. Complete registration for using the WA EHDDI Database (complete by May 15)
  6. Obtain UW Medical Center ID badge in-person on first day of externship May 31, 2022

Orientation

Review documents by May 30

Complete during your first week of your externship

  • Find CHHD (and UW SPH Clinic)
    • Directions in Work-Life Balance section below
  • Complete a room and supplies orientation: orient yourself to the location of supplies and equipment in all test rooms/suites using the “map” and walking through every room and identifying equipment and supplies
    • 1st floor of CHDD
      • Room: a lunchroom available for use by students with microwave and refrigerator and snack and drink machines.
      • CD150 classroom (across the courtyard): for Monday LEND Seminars
    • 2nd floor of CHDD:
      • CHDD Front Desk and waiting room
      • Offices for clinical coordinators: rooms 207, 208, 209
      •  Laundry room: room 277
      • 2nd floor Conference Room for team meetings: 246
    • 4th floor of CHDD
      • CHDD faculty offices
      • 4th floor refrigerator and microwave
    • 3rd floor of CHDD
      • 3rd floor conference rooms: rooms 301, 365
      • 3rd floor waiting room
      • Room 341 is the Observation and Audiology meeting room
        • Keys: keys to open the audiology clinical rooms are located in the student desk
        • Forms: chart review forms
        • Resources: hearing technology notebook, family resource notebooks
        • Computer: the computers in 341 have access to the EPIC electronic medical record system using your UWMC ID/login as well as parent education materials in a folder on the desktop.
        • Standing files of patient charts: charts for upcoming patients
        • File cabinet: patient charts for all permanent patients in CHDD Audiology
        • Supplies: office supplies are located in the upper wall cabinets
      • Rooms 339/340 is the behavioral test booth suite
        • Patient side (339):
          • Ear tips for testing and tape for securing eartips, container for dirty tips
          • VRA centering toys
          • CPA games
          • VRA/CPA assistant receiver
        • Control room (340):
          • audiometer, VRA reinforcer DVDs and control boxes, CD player for speech audiometry, blank audiograms ,VRA worksheets
          • recorded speech materials and response books
          • outcome measure questionnaires
          • remote mic DM transmitter for communicating with assistant
      • Room 342 is used for Immittance/OAE, hearing technology and counseling of parents.
        • Cabinet near door (C, D):
          • additional supplies of eartips and paper for equipment
          • tools for cleaning OAE and tympanometry probes
          • FM and HAT consignments devices
          • Device user manuals
          • Patient devices to be fit
        • Cabinet near table (A, B):
          • Computer: for reviewing/printing OAE data and for NOAH and hearing aid programming. If the computer has been logged off, the log-on password is located on the cabinet door below the computer. Printer/scanner is for scanning clinical data for clinical reports.
          • Earmold supplies: ear dams, impression material, earlights, syringes, splead pad, earmold boxes, tubing, tube cutters/stretchers, superglue.
          • Hearing aid supplies: batteries, battery doors, earhooks, supplies for RITE and open fit, hearing aid care kits and patient care supplies (lubricant, ear clips, dry kits, wax loops, double-sided tape, listening tubes, earmold blowers)
          • Demo hearing aids, earmold examples
      • Rooms 331/332 are the ABR test room suite.
        • Patient side (332):
          • blue cabinet: Patient preparation materials (alcohol wipes, gauze pads and Nu-prep), eartips and tape, electrodes and clean pillowcases
        • Control room side (331)
          • ABR worksheets
          • BAER equipment: Biologic NavPro system.

Externs should expect to participate in 45 weeks of full-time (40 hours per week) clinical experiences. During vacation and holidays, patients are not scheduled.

Check the UW LEND Audiology Externship calendar for updates on specifics of your rotations, reading assignments, preceptor absences, etc. Use the “Summary” tab setting for viewing the Audiology Extern calendar for a quick

2021-22 UW LEND AuD Externship Dates

  • Summer quarter
    • June 1-Aug 20, 2021: full-time clinic schedule
    • Holidays: July 5
    • June 14-18, 2021: vacation
    • Aug 23-Sept 3, 2021: vacation
  • Autumn quarter
    • Sept 7-Dec 17, 2021: full-time clinic schedule
    • Sept 20: UW LEND Orientation all day
    • Holidays: Nov 11, Nov 25-26
    • Dec 20-31, 2021: vacation
  • Winter quarter
    • Jan 3-March 18, 2022: full-time clinic schedule
    • Holidays: Jan 17, Feb 14
    • March 13-15, 2022: externs at EHDI Conference
    • March 21-25, 2022: vacation
  • Spring quarter:
    • March 28-May13: full-time clinic schedule
    • Holidays: May 30
    • May 16-June 4: Externs will not see patients at UW after their academic graduation but will participate in LEND Monday Seminars in-person or remotely and work on LEND Leadership project slides/poster.
    • June 6, 2022: LEND Leadership Day: an all-day seminar at CHDD with LEND trainee slide and poster presentations, followed by a UW LEND Audiology evening celebration.

2022-23 UW LEND AuD Externship Dates

Externs should expect to participate in 45 weeks of full-time (40 hours per week) clinical experiences during the 2022-23 UW AuD externship. During vacation and holidays, patients are not scheduled.

  • Summer quarter
    • Clinic full-time: May 31-Aug 19, 2022
    • Holidays: June 20, July 4
    • Vacations: June 14-20, 2022; Aug 22-Sept 5, 2022
  • Autumn quarter
    • Clinic full-time: Sept 6-Dec 18, 2022
    • UW LEND Orientation: Sept 19: in-person at Center for Urban Horticulture
    • Holidays: Sept 5, Nov 11, Nov 24-25
    • Vacation: Dec 19-Dec 30, 2022
  • Winter quarter
    • Clinic full-time: Jan 3-March 17, 2023
    • Holidays: Jan 2, Jan 16, Feb 20
    • Conference: EHDI Conference: ?dates
    • Vacation: March 20-24, 2023
  • Spring quarter:
    • Clinic full-time: March 27-mid-May
    • Conference: AAA Audiology now in Seattle Apr 19-22, 2023
    • Holidays: May 29
    • Mid-May-June 5: Externs will not see patients at UW after their academic graduation but will participate in LEND Monday Seminars in-person or remotely and work on LEND Leadership project slides/poster.
    • LEND Leadership Day: June 5, 2023: an all-day seminar at CHDD with LEND trainee slide and poster presentations, followed by a UW LEND Audiology evening celebration.
  • Extern goals
    • Learning profile : Externs will complete a learning profile and share with preceptors during the first week of the quarter. The learning profile should address:
      • My clinical strengths include:
      • Clinical and interpersonal areas in which I feel I could improve:
      • My clinical practice goals for this quarter include:
    • Weekly Intentions: Externs are expected to come to clinic each week with an “Intention of the Week” and incorporate into clinical practice and communications with families. Externs will share their intention with their preceptors by writing on the whiteboard in the student office. Weekly intentions can be based on the extern identifying a specific skill to work on or from the Weekly Intentions list.
  • Preceptor and Self Evaluation
    • Weekly Feedback: Externs will receive daily verbal feedback from preceptors. Preceptors and externs will regularly discuss progress and identify areas for growth.
    • End of quarter evaluation: Primary preceptors will summarize feedback from preceptors in end of quarter evaluations in evaluation software
      • August
      • December
      • May
  • Expectations for Clinical Skills
    • 1st Quarter (Summer): Establish a Foundation of Skills
      • By the end of the 1st quarter, the extern should be able to perform some functions without assistance but may need frequent instruction and/or modeling from preceptor, particularly for new experiences. By the end of the 1st quarter, the extern should have a foundation of skills in all areas.
    • 2nd Quarter (Autumn): Build Skills
      • By the end of the 2nd quarter, the student extern should be able to perform most functions without assistance and need occasional instruction and/or modeling from preceptors. Student externs should be incorporating preceptor feedback into skill development.
    • 3rd quarter (Winter): Refine Skills
      • By the end of the 3rd quarter, the student extern should be able to perform most skills independently with input  from preceptor for complex skills, as needed. The extern should incorporate critical thinking into clinical decisions.
    • 4th quarter (Spring): Lead
      • By the end of the 4th quarter, the student should be able to perform all skills independently and seek out consultation input from preceptor. The extern plans sessions, leads appointments and debriefing sessions. The extern seeks out research and resources independently and provides resources to families.
Welcome the whole family Audiologist includes all present family members in the appointment.

We set the tone for the appointment, by welcoming the family to the collaborative conversation.

In situations where we’re meeting the family for the first time particularly when seeing the family for a new consultation, it is helpful to get their input on what information they already have

Identify names and family roles of those present.

Use eye contact and direct communication with every family member.

“You’re here to learn about your child’s hearing today. “

 

“I want to make sure we use our time together today to address your questions and concerns.”

“What do you want make sure we cover during this consultation today?”

Small Talk Informal conversations when walking down the clinic hallway, or when waiting between clinical measures/activities. Small talk has the power to break the ice, build connections, calm an individual/family who is uncertain about the visit or procedure. Greet the  family appropriately and remember names; safe topics of discussion are about the family’s journey to get to the clinic, the weather, logistics of finding building/rooms. Signpost about what’s going to happen next.
Body and Facial Language Body and facial language of the audiologist play a significant role in the effectiveness of the conversation. Position yourself in a chair so that you can communicate with all family members; avoid standing. Use good attending behaviors with eye contact and leaning forward. Avoid focusing on your notes on your clipboard or spending too much time documenting.
Neutral terminology Choose words that are clear and family-friendly and not “loaded” with other meanings. Measure  vs Test;

Hearing level vs hearing loss;

Identify vs diagnose;

evaluate vs test;

did not pass vs fail

No Cheerleading We sometimes add comments that show some value judgment of the findings when it isn’t necessary to comment either way.

When families share information with us we can get in a pattern of responding with responding with a “cheerleading response” instead of a neutral response.

“He shows typical hearing today…these findings align with your perspective that he is responding well to sound” instead of “He has normal hearing…good news!”

“We don’t have any concerns for how he is talking”.. “That’s helpful information” instead of ”that’s great”.

Cross-check equipment Use of a systematic approach to ensure that equipment is set correctly before starting testing Talk to self out loud while checking equipment settings.

Cross-check with test assistant.

Audiometer: STELR method (stimulus, transducer, level, ear, (reinforcer)) for both channels

Ready to listen Ensure that patient is attentive and ready prior to presenting stimuli. Audiologist determine readiness before presenting by checking in.

Test assistant  facilitate the child’s readiness: “get ready”, “Listen”, “voice off”,

Maximize child participation and choice The audiologist and assistant use strategies to motivate the child to participate with positive reinforcement and providing choice “A few more than we’re done”

“Three more and then we’ll change games”; “Do you want to do this one first or this one?”;

Get it the First Time Obtain an accurate measure on the first attempt by setting up equipment appropriately and getting the audiologist and patient in a position that allows accurate implementation. Appropriate tip size and test parameters are selected first.

Audiologist has patient ear at eye level.

Parent and assistant use passive restraint and distraction toy when needed.

Inter-stimulus interval ISI=the time between stimulus presentations The audiologist varies the ISI to avoid patterning and encouraging the individual to respond falsely.
Conditioning and Probe trials Conditioning: VRA: audiologist pairs the stimulus and the reinforcer at an audible level

Probe trials: audiologist presents an audible stimulus to determine if the child is conditioned; Threshold search begins after a response on a probe trial; if no response, conditioning trials continue.

 

Used primarily in VRA and CPA testing, but may be useful in conventional audiometry.
Response bias Audiologist is “invested” in the patient responding which influences strategies of interpreting responses and ultimately impacts validity of results. Patient thresholds at last visit should not be used as an expectation of current thresholds.

Adhere to the bracketing staircase protocol and only repeat a trial if the trial is considered a toss trial due to inattention.

Reluctant responder Individual  who is reluctant to respond to audible stimuli Audiologist: provide more conditioning trials

Assistant: VRA: shaping, less interesting centering toy; CPA: model with parent and assistant playing CPA game

 

Impulsive responder Individual who responds when there is no stimulus Role of audiologist: if unsure of the validity of the response, do not reinforce/do not credit as a response; increase level until individual responds consistently

Role of assistant: VRA: increase interest of centering toy; CPA: provide negative reinforcement: “no sound” ,“wait for the sound”

Social reinforcement Providing encouragement for the patient’s response. VRA: point to reinforcer after it is activated, “you get to see the doggie”

CPA: “You’re really listening:, You’re working hard” “that was a little one”

 

Cross-check principle Behavioral and physiologic measures are integrated into a complete evaluation to confirm results across various procedures. SRT/SAT= cross check of frequency-specific thresholds

OAE and acoustic reflex=cross check of ABR, behavioral

Diagnostic Efficiency Use of a personalized order of testing that starts with the measures identified as being the most crucial for the assessment. The audiologist reviews the child’s previous audiological records, determines what assessment measures are high priority.
Open-ended questions Open-ended questions trigger reflective conversations which prompt families to think more deeply about their experiences and actions, while letting them know that you care. These conversations prepare the ground for families to help themselves and create an atmosphere for self-management, rather than one where hearing care professionals drive the agenda.  “How is he hearing at home?”

“Tell me about his communication skills.”

“Tell me about how it’s going with incorporating hearing aids into your daily lives.”

“What works for you when he removes his hearing aids?”

“How do you feel like this information fits with your perspective on his hearing?”

 

Acknowledge Acknowledgments are powerful ways to acknowledge the parent perspective.  “It’s hard to see the impact of hearing loss young children.”

“It’s understandable that from your perspective he is hearing well…”

“You’ve worked really hard to…”

“It’s working for you to…”

“It sounds like you’re comfortable with ….”

“On one hand you realize the hearing aids help her and on the other hand you see that she hears pretty well without them.”

“It sounds like your concerns about people’s comments and questions about his hearing aids are limiting you having him wear them outside of your home.”

Silence We all benefit from moments of silence during the conversation, to pause and think.

 

Resist the urge to fill silence when you’re uncomfortable.
Listen to Understand Be present in the moment and seek to understand the family perspective. Avoid listening to respond and listening to judge. “How it’s going with …

“What works for you when …”

“How do you feel like this information fits with your perspective?”

 

Summarize and Translate Audiologists are effective in communicating complex audiological information when results are summarized into family-friendly phrasing, Start with an overview of the findings. Follow with  a few short sentences translating the impact of the hearing loss. Avoid describing tests.

 

“She has a permanent partial hearing loss.”

“He has fluid in his ears that is causing a partial temporary hearing loss”.

“She can hear louder sounds and not softer sounds”.

 

Illuminate Illuminate the impact of hearing loss; impact on auditory access, communication, learning, and brain development.  Address unique aspects of the impact of HL in special populations (e.g., UHL, ANSD). Interpret outcome measures to provide insight into the impact of the hearing loss in this child with or without hearing technology, or both. “Hearing loss affects communication and learning.”

“Brain development is impacted by limited access to communication and learning.”

 

Family Perspective Based on what limited information we have we can start to form some hypotheses about the perspective the family might bring to the appointment. Prior to meeting with a family, think about how you might individualize the conversation for the family.

It may be helpful to think about what stage the family is at on their journey of acknowledging, addressing, accepting hearing loss.

 

Where is the family at in developing resiliency for addressing the hearing loss?

Is resistance to addressing hearing loss where the family is at right now?

How are family resources a factor in their journey?

 

 

Family resiliency Resilient families have inner strength and the ability to respond to change and challenges. Resilient families may experience emotional responses to the challenges, but they are able to find their way on their journey.

 

Recognize that families vary in their
Family culture The family culture includes beliefs and behavior and explains how they view the world and what they value. Family culture factors:

Family view of deafness/disability, health professionals/fields

Neutral  perspective When we pause to consider our own perspective for the consultation, we can work on facilitating a neutral but supportive perspective for the conversation. What are my objectives for the consultation? Do I have a hidden agenda for this family? “I’m wondering where they’re at with considering how to address their child’s hearing.”

“What are the family’s barriers to using hearing technology right now?”

 

Calm and Supportive Families may bring worries and frustrations to the visit, but the calm and supportive tone of the audiologist sets the stage for the patient and family’s experience. Audiologist expresses to the family the commitment to provide them with information and support.

 

Signpost Provide a summary/signpost to transition to the next stage of the conversation. A summary statement can acknowledge the importance of the discussion but also signal that it might be a good time to move on to other tasks to accomplish during the visit.

 

“We’ve been talking about…; I’m wondering if you’re ready to move on to talking about …”

“We’ve been talking about X; I’m thinking that we should come back to this discussion either later today or at the next visit, so we can make sure we accomplish some other measures that we planned for today’s visit”.

 

Person-centered terminology A disability-centered perspective categorizes and classifies based upon deficits.    A person-centered perspective promotes the strengths and capabilities of an individual. Child who is DHH vs hearing impaired child;

Child with typical hearing vs normal hearing child

Acknowledge Acknowledgements let the family know we’re listening and that we understand them. The reflective nature of our response helps the family sort out their own thoughts; when their comments are reflected back to them, they see them more clearly. A reflection may also take the form of continuing on what the parent said, but is yet unsaid. A reflection also allows the parent to correct our misinterpretation.

 

o    “It’s hard to see the impact of hearing differences in young children.”

o    “It’s understandable that from your perspective he is hearing well…”

o    “You’ve worked really hard to…”

o    “It’s working for you to…”

o    “It sounds like you’re comfortable with ….”

o    “On one hand you realize the hearing aids help her and on the other hand you see that she hears pretty well without them.”

o    “It sounds like your concerns about people’s comments and questions about his hearing aids are limiting you having him wear them outside of your home.”

 

Just in Time Information Provide information and resources that meet the needs of the family at the moment.

Use a list of questions (the Sound Beginnings/Sound for Life questionnaires) to give families ideas of information that might be helpful to them on their journey

 “Do you need some more detail about…?”

“What additional information would be helpful for you?”

“Would be helpful for you in exploring…?”

“Is this a good time for us to talk about…?”

 

Shared decision making The hearing care providers bring experience and knowledge to the partnership about what works on average and in typical ways. The patient brings expert knowledge on their life, circumstances, and what matters most to them. Good communication and a good relationship are required to enable both parties to talk freely about the choices and to weigh the pros and cons of a course of action.
Roll with Resistance Resistance is a natural reaction for families dealing with the unexpected challenges of raising a child who is DHH. The family culture will impact the intensity and duration of the family resistance.

 

Empathy The capacity to understand how others experience the world.

Professional Conduct

  • Externs are expected to have professional conduct in  interactions with families, with fellow students,  preceptors, and colleagues. Externs dress appropriately for clinic, with no open-toed shoes, non-sleeve tops/dresses, shorts. At CHDD, externs can wear either professional clothing or medical scrubs (UWMC or personal). At SPHC, externs dress in professional clothing with an optional white coat .Tattoos must be covered during clinic. Working with children involves sitting on the floor, and a lot of bending and squatting;  clinic outfits should be comfortable and modest during these clinic maneuvers. In accordance with UW Medicine guidelines, UWMC ID card must be worn on entering all UWMC and CHDD buildings. UW Medicine and CHDD require a fragrance-free workplace.
  • Clinic rooms are cell-free zones; with cell phones kept with  personal belongings except for during lunch breaks.
  • Computers in clinic rooms are for UW work only, not personal use. Printers can be used for printing clinical documents, but not for personal use.

Attendance/Punctuality

  • Regular attendance every week is a requirement and arranged absences must be approved by the preceptor during the first week of the quarter.
  • Students should not come to clinic if you are ill or if you become ill during the day, you should go home; students are expected to use sick time to rest and seek medical care, if needed. Students are not expected to do work during sick time, however, unfinished reports need to be assigned to either the other student or preceptor and all clinic documents need to be uploaded. If students are ill, contact the preceptor by email or phone as soon as possible so that accommodations can be made.
  • Students need to arrive to do an equipment check and then meet to discuss patients at the times specified for the clinic day. Students who arrive late and are not present for patient discussion will not be permitted to remain in clinic that day.

Report deadlines

  • First drafts of  reports should be completed by the end of the work day, unless an alternative schedule has been discussed. If a report is incomplete, your preceptor will notify you that further additions are needed.
  •  Preceptors will provide edits and comments to your reports  by the following day.

Clinical hours

  • Documentation of hours
    • Externs document their clinic hours within their student evaluation software systems each week; all hours at CHDD should be completed on your last day (Tues/Wed) at CHDD each week. Externs should document both time spent with the patient and family as well as preparation time and report writing time, consultation time, using the guidelines specific to the student’s university.
    • You are required to accrue a total of 1800 hours during your 4 years of your AuD program. Up to 10% (180) hours can be accrued using clinical simulation (observing, case-based learning).

Clinical Learning Opportunities

  • Externs will be expected to participate in clinical education activities during times between patients including case-based learning, practice with equipment and protocol, evaluation and selection of hearing technology, professional presentations, development of family resources, etc.

Room Use/Building access

  • The clinic building doors are unlocked 7:30am to 5:30pm; students can use their CHDD key for entry to the building. Students may remain in the building after 5:00pm to complete reports and chart review. Students must wear ID cards at all times during clinic and while in the clinic building and need to be dressed professionally any time in the building, as patients are present.
  • Room 341 is the student office and students are responsible for keeping this room clean. Personal belongings are stored in the small file cabinets and coats are stored on the door hooks. Dispose of all “garbage” in the appropriate bins at the end of the hallway every day. Clean out food in the fridge at the end of each week. Wipe down the interior of the microwave after use. Put all paperwork with patient information in the shredding bins.

Universal Precautions and Infection Control

Health monitoring

  • Student externs are not permitted to come to work if the extern has any of the following health issues: fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell.

Office safety

  • Due to the increased transmission with COVID variants, UWMC is requiring that providers remain masked during all in-person meetings and office work. Masks can only be removed if working alone in a room with the door closed.

Wearing masks and face shields or goggles

  • Wear your home mask when you enter the building and walk to your office. Sanitize your hands and then remove your mask and place in a bag in your backpack/purse.
  • Sanitize your hands and then put on your work mask.
  • Remove your work mask for eating and for leaving work by sanitizing your hands first, remove the used mask and dispose. Put on your home mask to leave the building.
  • Use a face mask during all appointments. Use an N95 mask instead of a surgical mask for high risk appointments.
  • Use mask using appropriate method
  • Use goggles or face shield with appropriate method, as needed
  • Use guidelines for using PPE

Hand sanitizing

Equipment and room cleaning

  • Clean hearing aids/earmolds prior to hearing aid/earmold trouble-shooting and verification
    • Place the hearing aid and earmold in a clean container.
    • Disconnect the earmolds from the hearing aid.
    • Clean both the hearing aids and earmolds with a hearing aid equipment sanitizing cloth/alcohol wipe.
    • Complete hearing aid verification/troubleshooting.
  • Clean rooms, furniture and equipment
    • At the end of every appointment, providers and students clean the surfaces of door knobs, equipment, furniture and toys that were touched by the patient and family members and providers using gloves and  sanitizing cloths.
    • Dispose of ear tips.
    • Ensure that furniture is  ready for the next patient and all supplies are returned to cabinets
    • Turn on air purifier and close test room door at the end of the appointment for approximately 15 minutes, to clear the air between patients. Turn off the air purifier during appointments.
  • Safety in accessing rooms:
    • The test rooms at CHDD have unusual steps and thresholds that children and families can easily trip on and injure themselves. Always escort families across these thresholds/steps in/out of the test rooms every time.

Housing

  • There are many platforms for finding an apartment or house either independent or shared including craigslist, and Airbnb long-term rentals.
  • The Radford Court Apartments are owned by UW, but are open to non-UW students. Great quiet location next to a huge park and on a short bus ride to UW with relatively easy access to groceries, etc.

Transportation

  • CHDD is located at 1701 NE Columbia Road, behind/south of the UW Medical Center: map and CHDD directions
  • The UW Speech and Hearing Clinic is located at 4131 15th Ave NE: map and SPH Clinic directions
  • You can get to the CHDD clinic and the SPH Clinic by public transportation, walking, biking, or driving your car.
  • There are bike racks outside the 1st floor of CHDD.
  • Parking on campus is typically $14 to $17 for all day parking or $4 per hour: The S1 parking garage next to CHDD or E18 parking next to Husky Stadium are the closest options.
  • The Health Sciences Express is a free shuttle bus that runs from UW Medical Center to Harborview Medical Center, and UW Medicine-Roosevelt Clinic. The UW Fred Hutch South Lake Union is a free shuttle bus that runs from UW Medical Center to Fred Hutch and South Lake Union. For both shuttles, the UWMC RR wing bus stop is across the street from CHDD on Columbia Way.
  • You may be able to get a UPASS as a more affordable option for using public transportation through the Transportation Services office. 

Work-Life balance

  • Professional Self-care
    • Practice self-care in your personal life . Mindfulness and self-care are personal practices that keep you healthy and emotionally balanced. Mindfulness practice outside of the work place helps you develop skills of positive regard, sensitivity and empathy for the families you work with. Audiologists are at risk for compassion fatigue and professional burnout.
    • Use self-care strategies during the work day.
      • In the few minutes before you meet with a family, center yourself by using relaxation strategies like deep breathing and a personal affirmation statement. Bring awareness to your feelings about the appointmen.
      • Eat healthy foods that provide your body/mind with energy and drink lots of water throughout your work day.
  • Leisure activities

UW LEND Audiology Trainees receive support to attend the annual EHDI Conference.

EHDI Conference travel expenses including airfare, hotel, meals and conference registration will be covered by UW LEND.

The schedule below highlights important parts of EHDI

  • Saturday: Travel day
    • UW LEND dinner
  • Sunday:
    • 9:00am-2:00pm: conference sessions-registration and additional fees required for Sunday sessions
    •  2:00-5:00pm: LEND Trainee Seminar
    • 5:00-6:00pm: EHDI student kick-off
  • Monday
    • 6:45-8:00am: Breakfast provided in the exhibit hall/7:00-7:50am-student networking
    • 8:30am: Sessions start
  • Tuesday
    • 6:45-8:00am: Breakfast provided in the exhibit hall//7:00-7:50am-student networking
    • Conference ends at approximately 5:00pm
    • Travel to Seattle Tuesday evening

Meal allotment:

  • $18 breakfast, $19 lunch, $34 dinner
  • Meals covered:
    • Sat:  dinner
    • Sun: breakfast, lunch, dinner
    • Mon: (breakfast provided) lunch, dinner
    • Tues: (breakfast provided) lunch, dinner
  • Keep your receipts for hotel, conference registration, and ground transportation. You do not need to keep food receipts; you will be reimbursed for the above meals at the rate above.
  • UW LEND externs receive a LEND stipend of $7000; distributed in payments in September, December, March, and June.

UW LEND Responsibilities

  • Monitor the LEND calendar for links to participate in weekly seminar and associated readings
  • Monitor the LEND Audiology Calendar for weekly assignments and readings
  • Attend weekly LEND Seminars on Mondays: 12:30-1:30 on 2nd to 5th Mondays; 12:30-4:30pm on 1st Mondays in Nov, Feb, Apr; 12:30-3:00pm on 1st Mondays in Oct, Dec, Mar, May; complete post-webinar survey to document attendance and provide feedback
  • Participate in monthly Squad Meetings
  • Read the assigned LEND book choice and participate in book discussion
  • Complete EHCO Training: Watch recordings of ECHO Autism Washington sessions and case discussion; for access, email echoautismwa@uw.edu
  • Complete a LEND Leadership Project on a topic relevant to Pediatric Audiology and LEND
  • Complete Adolescent Transition Curriculum in Spring quarter
  • Maintain your LEND ePortfolio with goals for each academic quarter,  quarterly reflective summaries of experiences and growth, and tracking of activities and hours
  • Join the AUCD trainee listserve and participate in discussions
  • Review the websites for the national organizations of MCHB and LEND  and LEND Audiology
  • Complete the MCH Leadership Competencies Scavenger hunt
  • View AUCD trainee orientation videos
  • Join and participate in a professional listserv, blog, or other type of online discussion specific to your discipline or other MCH topic
  • Follow >1 leader on social media: Identify someone you look up to as a leader in MCH, Advocacy, Legislator or elected official, someone in your field, etc. Follow their postings throughout the year.
  • Watch “Tuesdays with Liz” every week
  • Sign up for a meeting with the UW LEND director when you get more details via email
Where Pediatric Clinical Care and Leadership Training Intersect
intersect-mobile
Onboarding

Onboarding

  • Complete electronic medical records registration and training (Complete by May 15)
    •  Set up UW Medicine account: go to myuw and log in with your UW net ID. Locate the “UW Medicine Computing Services” section and click “Change your UW Medicine password”. The link may read “Retrieve and change your UW Medicine password” instead of “Change your UW Medicine password”.
    • Complete training through the Learning Management System: go to the UW Medicine Learning Management System and log in with your UW NetID and password. Find the “To Do” section in the middle navigation panel and the “EHR EpicCare – Audiology Students” curriculum. Click on the small arrow to expand the list of modules. Note that in some browsers it is difficult to see the small triangle that must be expanded to see all of the green start buttons. Training modules include HIPAA training and bloodborne pathogen training. Print the completion certificate for your HIPAA training.
  • Obtain UW Medical Center ID badge in-person on first day of externship (June 1, 2020)

Orientation

  • Review the details in the General Guidelines document
  • Review the Pediatric Assessment Protocol guidelines for age-appropriate testing and interpretation
  • Review the Chart Review and Report Writing guidelines
  • Review the Conversations guidelines
  • Review the Hearing Technology guidelines
  • Review the Equipment guidelines
  • Complete a room and supplies orientation: orient yourself to the location of supplies and equipment in all test rooms/suites using the “map” and walking through every room and identifying equipment and supplies
  • 1st floor of CHDD
    • Room: a lunchroom available for use by students with microwave and refrigerator and snack and drink machines.
    • CD150 classroom (across the courtyard): for Monday Core Seminars
  • 2nd floor of CHDD:
    • Offices: 207, 208, 209: office for clinical coordinators
    • Room 277: laundry room
    • 2nd floor Conference Room for team meetings: 246
  • 3rd floor of CHDD
    • Keys: keys to open the audiology clinical rooms are located on top of the right reinforcer in the behavioral test booth (room 339). Return the key immediately after use so others have access. Hang the booth padlocks on the hook inside the control room doors.
    • Room 341 is the Observation and Audiology meeting room
      • Forms: chart review forms, and developmental checklists.
      • Computer: the computer in 341 has access to the EPIC electronic medical record system using your UWMC ID/login as well as parent education materials in a folder on the desktop.
      • Standing files of patient charts: charts for upcoming patients
    • File cabinet: patient charts for all permanent patients in CHDD Audiology.
  • Rooms 339/340 is the behavioral test booth suite
    • Patient side (339):
      • Ear tips for testing and tape for securing eartips, container for dirty tips
      • Centering toys for VRA (blue box)
      • play audiometry toys (small cabinet)
      • Audiology keys (on top of right reinforcer)
    • Control room (340):
      • audiometer, VRA reinforcer DVDs and control boxes, CD player for speech audiometry, blank audiograms ,VRA worksheets
      • recorded speech materials and response books
      • outcome measure questionnaires
    • Room 342 is used for Immittance/OAE,hearing technology and counseling of parents.
      • Cabinet near door (C, D):
        • additional supplies of eartips and paper for equipment
        • tools for cleaning OAE and tympanometry probes
        • FM and HAT consignments devices
        • Device user manuals
        • Patient devices to be fit
      • Cabinet near table (A, B):
        • Computer: for reviewing/printing OAE data and for NOAH and hearing aid programming. If the computer has been logged off, the log-on password is located on the cabinet door below the computer. Printer/scanner is for scanning clinical data for clinical reports.
        • Earmold supplies: ear dams, impression material, earlights, syringes, splead pad, earmold boxes, tubing, tube cutters/stretchers, superglue.
        • Hearing aid supplies: batteries, battery doors, earhooks, supplies for RITE and open fit, hearing aid care kits and patient care supplies (lubricant, ear clips, dry kits, wax loops, double-sided tape, listening tubes, earmold blowers)
        • Demo hearing aids, earmold examples
      • Rooms 331/332 are the ABR test room suite.
        • Patient side (332):
          • blue cabinet: Patient preparation materials (alcohol wipes, gauze pads and Nu-prep), eartips and tape, electrodes and clean pillowcases
        • Control room side (331)
          • ABR worksheets
          • BAER equipment: Biologic NavPro system.
Assessment

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Documentation

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Work-life Balance

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